Plan of Care

navigating through nursing school

Monthly Archives: August 2010

Working through the worries (or, I am a neurotic girly-girl); Orientation Day

Today is Orientation, and so of course immediately in sets my particular brand of organizational panic: that being that everything I needed done in advance is, of course, not done. Case in point: I can’t find things and my parking sticker is not properly affixed to my vehicle.

Why? I don’t properly know. Because I hadn’t done it before now. For me this task includes cutting, something I’m fairly bad at doing in a straight line, so I need Boyfriend to help. Boyfriend is annoyed at my morning-person tendencies as of late and is completely ignoring me by way of getting out of bed just to go back to sleep on the couch. I don’t entirely blame him, but here I am, helpless, because he is the tailor and it is his damn rotary cutter that I need to use to cut the transparency that the nice Staples people gave me for free in order to have something to stick the sticker to that is not being permanently stuck to the window of the car, which only theoretically belongs to me (I still sometimes have nightmares that my dad will just casually ask for it back. My dad is buying a new BMW, he doesn’t need my six-year-old Toyota, although he does borrow it when in my area). Maybe I should ask Boyfriend to wake up and help me cut the transparency and stick the sticker on. It’s not like I actually know how to use the rotary cutter. And being able to park legally would be a plus.

Then immediately I realize that something is wrong with the picture over by my mirror. Namely, that my eyeshadow and concealer are both gone. They are not on the floor right by the mirror, or in my purse, or in the ensuite, and I never keep makeup in the properly-sized bathroom. Check anyway. Nope, no makeup there. I really need the concealer because it is also my acne medication, and without it I have let’s say a lot of problems with my face looking as if it’s entirely made of bumps. Not a good plan in my book. Frantic looking for concealer yields nothing.

And I haven’t had breakfast yet. Or taken a shower. I have over twenty inches of hair, it takes some time to dry, and I can’t go over it with the iron (which I need to prevent my frizz attacks in reaction to any weather over 50 degrees) until it is actually dry. I should eat breakfast before I take the shower, in case I do something weird like get food in my hair, which is actually not all that weird when I haven’t trimmed my normally cheekbone-length bangs in three weeks and they sometimes dangle into my mouth. I should probably add “trim bangs” to the list of things I haven’t yet done today.

Having gotten distracted thinking about the bangs I won’t trim until later tonight anyway, I’ve managed to forget what else I was supposed to be worrying about. Not sure if I’m going to bring my netbook or not; after all, I have no sleeve for it and I’d hate for it to get chipped. (It’s new. RIP, old netbook that fit in the sleeve I had, I will miss you and hope you manage to be repaired by a parent who can use you.) But I wasn’t focused on that before, I was reminded of it letting my eyes roam across my dining area to where the netbook was hanging out on a chair. I think I was busily worrying about what shirt I was going to wear, and if it was okay to wear my knee-high boots because they’re the most supportive shoes I have and I’m having a very bad foot week, and then concern over coordinating eyeshadow I can’t find with a shirt I haven’t identified, and only then did I manage to start thinking about jewelry, and then paused full-stop to realize how much of a girl I am.

I should probably go eat breakfast. Take a shower. Make sure all the stuff that needs to be in my purse is actually in my purse, not forgetting my CPR card this time. Pick out clothes. Don’t put them on. Find coordinating makeup. Put that on first. Then put on clothes. Then take hair down from towel. Sit on porch until hair is dry enough to iron, then iron. At some point in this hope that Boyfriend has dealt with the vehicle tag’s being cut and then find some tape to affix it to the car. Fret over shoes. Give up, find socks, wear knee-high boots anyway because in medical fields your feet are an important investment. Continue racking brain to attempt to remember where I was going to go before my orientation (after is easier: grocery store, parallel parking extravaganza, maybe Staples, definitely drugstore, probably somewhere else that has just slipped my mind), give up, leave anyway.

That sounds like a decent enough plan.

All of this passed through my mind in the span of about two minutes. It took me ten to actually write it out. I don’t know what that says, either, but it certainly is easier to go back and take it all in when I can stare at it. Thank you, blog. My apologies, readers.

In the News

Jut some health-related stuff I’ve read recently. I try not to link to, like, the entire New York Times health section, so I cut down on my linking tendencies a lot when I moved blogs. (I used to do things like … link to a good third of the New York Times health articles.) There are three, because usually when I link news items I go for three (sometimes five). Today it’s technically three and a half.

11 years old, on the pill and sexually active? The media loses the news again – an article explaining that 11-year-old girls are taking contraception, but it’s not why the mainstream media wants to jump to make you think. This quote stands out:

Taking hormonal contraception is, for many girls, a means of ensuring they don’t miss school.

Yes. While I hate to insert personal takes on my news generally, here, I can’t resist. (Blogs are supposed to be somewhat personal, right? … Right?) This is me, but my parents, unlike the parents of these 11-year-olds who are heavily involved in the decision, didn’t want me to take estrogens until I was an adult. So I had worsening medical problems until about a year ago, when a practitioner explained to me why it is that I was so disabled 7 days in 28, that it was causing neurological issues and that I needed to be put on medication to control it. So I sure know how it feels to be one of those kids who need hormonal contraception for reasons besides, say, contraception.

Taking hormones can be scary, and in some ways can be dangerous, and yes, it does increase the risk of stroke (this is something that really concerned my mother, which is part of why I waited until I was on my own).

There’s one more quote from that article I want to include, just because, well, it scared me.

During the course of today I’ve spoken to 15 journalists, mostly working for radio and TV news stations, and 13 of which have been male.

Through these conversations I discovered none of the journalists knew hormonal contraception had medical uses. All of them assumed hormonal contraception was simply used to prevent pregnancy. And because of this assumption it hadn’t occurred to them to find out what else hormonal contraceptives might be used for.

Really? Really?

A Heart Pump Ticks Down, and a Stranger Steps In to Help – I love Denise Grady’s pieces most of the time, and they are usually straight-up facts about what’s going on in the health world. This article about heart pumps and their uses includes a feel-good story with an unexpectedly happy ending (I expected a happy ending; I didn’t expect an ending as happy as I got!) and a look at the marvels of medical mechanics.

I didn’t know much of anything about these assist pumps before, and reading the article made me want to learn more. Our star’s pump gave him his own little miracle – the fact that it continued to function well past when they expected it would, giving him almost an extra hour of clot-free living – but the real miracle was the efficiency that the hospital’s nurse practitioner found a man to come in and save the day.

Should McDonald’s offer free statins? – This headline just made me start giggling. It’s completely ridiculous, and personally while I completely support drug therapy when it’s needed, I think that McDonald’s actually providing statins to customers is off-the-charts bizarre, but apparently Imperial College London actually did a study offering that conclusion.

Fast food outlets like McDonald’s and Burger King should offer statins to neutralize the elevated risk of heart disease associated with eating cheeseburgers and milkshakes, a new study suggests.

Later in the article they clarify:

The authors don’t suggest that MCDonalds’, Buerger King and their competitors to provide statins to the burger eaters.  But the message of the study is clear, taking statins can lower heart disease associated with dietary fat – total fat and trans fat.

Well, if they don’t, then why start the article like that? Apparently, because it was a good hook. It got people reading it. It definitely got me reading it – and linking it, too.

Another article on the same topic, Burger and a statin to go? Or hold that, please? opens:

Fast food outlets should hand out free cholesterol-lowering statin drugs to their customers to “neutralize” the heart risks of eating fatty foods like burgers and fries, British scientists suggested on Thursday.

So do they, in fact, actually want the statins handed out with the food after all? Who knows. I don’t. This article continues with,

“Complimentary statin packets are prone to … give Quarter Pounder consumers a sense of false security,” [Dr. Messerli] told Reuters Health by email.

My reaction to that has got to be another really? Do you think? Complimentary. Statin. Packets?! Not that there’s any way that restaurants handing out prescription drugs is a good idea. I think Reuters’ experts may have missed that despite how Food Consumer phrased it (and who’s getting reliable medical news from a website called Food Consumer, anyway? I can understand getting reliable food news from Food Consumer …) the British study isn’t literally saying that.

I think.

Considering it’s been contradicted enough times. First they said it, then they didn’t. I’m confident they didn’t actually mean that restaurants should be handing out prescription drugs, but the responses to it make it sound like not everybody is convinced.

If they did actually say that, I’m not going to a fast food restaurant in the UK anytime soon. Or asking Imperial College London for pharmaceutical advice.

Griping about it may yet be the way to go

As after yesterday’s post, I looked at the available class seats for that one class I still needed (or I would lose my entire course schedule), and miraculously found that there was one (and exactly one) seat available that fit perfectly into my schedule.

Unfortunately that means that my Mondays begin at 6:30 am and end at 10:35pm, but that’s what I get. It’s not so bad.

Of course, then I was dumb and went to get my Nursing I manual bound so I didn’t have to put it in a binder … and now have a nice, professionally-bound manual that has all of my lab sheets bound permanently to the back of it. Sigh. I don’t want to have to have it bound again (it’s very nicely done and was only $3; Staples, I will never doubt you again!) but getting the pages out is somewhat of a difficult task. It’s a good thing Boyfriend has a rotary cutter, I guess.

Some days I just don’t know what to do with myself. Usually I sit on doing things for ages and meticulously plan. Today I decided I’d just go out and get something done … so of course the something was something that ended up not being the best move ever.

I’ll live.

More About Stuff

Well, first of all, my schedule is turning into a complete disaster as I learned microbiology is actually a co-requisite of everything else I’m taking, and there are currently, yep, no seats available. I might therefore lose my entire fall schedule and be stuck in school another year! Oh, life.

I don’t want to dwell on that, though. It’s so terribly discouraging. Instead, this is me talking about my supplies – today I went and picked up my textbooks.

After experiencing the sticker shock of the email telling me that they were ready, that would be approximately $600.

WTF? I say. My parents agree (they are the ones stuck paying for my books, as I really don’t have $600 to throw around – I don’t even have $90 to throw around). Needless to say, okay, better come up with $600. Thanks to my mother, that wasn’t too hard, and so today I went to the store to pick up Prepack #52.

It looked like this: (this image is a thumbnail)

Okay, no. Admittedly, it did not include the background contents of my desk, also pictured.Not the phone, not the page-a-day calendar currently displaying the wrong date, not the snowglobe. All those books, the lab manual on the bottom, the dissection kit and the glasses, though. And my school’s manual, which while I took a lovely photo of it is not included for anonymity purposes.

In order to make it easier to see what the books are (as somewhere someone might care, or wish to compare my educational institution’s , I provide another image:

My parents agreed it was actually pretty worth the $600.